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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
. tom's off tonight. americans are waiting to hear from president obama as he gives his state of the union speech. we look at his jobs plan and what wall street wants to hear from the president. and currency wars: g-7 countries say they're looking to boost their local economies, but critics say they're aiming to get ahead by weakening their currencies. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." we're hours away from president obama's state of the union address. americans aren't just listening for what he says but how he says it. will he strike a hopeful or optimistic tone, and will he offer a concrete plan to create jobs and grow the economy? washington bureau chief darren gersh reports. >> reporter: with more than half of americans thinking the economy is still in recession, it makes sense that the president is focused on a jobs agenda in his speech tonight. but while his plan may be new, the challenge is not. >> the economy is not growing fast because the demand for the goods and services that we can produce in this country has not increased very much. and unfortunately, the public s
. waiting for president obama's speech. now despite a cautious day of trading, the dow closed at its highest level in more than five years, and returned to the psychological important 14,000 level. the dow gained 47 points, and the nasdaq lost five, and the s&p 500 up two points. even though the stock market has made dramatic moves, and trading volume today and throughout february has been light. market pros say that's because investors are searching for new reasons to buy equities. there's a chance president obama might give them some tonight in his state of the union address. suzanne pratt has the story. >> reporter: with earnings season winding down, wall street could use some new headlines to chew on. good economic data would be nice. friendly washington politics would also be helpful. tonight's state of the union speech might give investors a clue as to whether that's likely to happen. veteran trader teddy weissberg is hoping president obama will stress the need for bipartisanship but isn't sure that's what he'll hear. >> in terms of tonight, i don't think anybody that i talk to in the
gersh reports, president obama today asked congress to delay the cuts before the march 1 deadline. >> reporter: with $44 billion in spending cuts in defense and most other federal programs just weeks away, the president urged congress to pass a mix of spending cuts and tax increases to ease the immediate hit. >> there is no reason that the jobs of thousands of americans who work in national security or education or clean energy, not to mention the growth of the entire economy, should be put in jeopardy just because folks in washington couldn't come together to eliminate a few special interest tax loopholes. >> reporter: republicans dismissed the calls for more tax increases, and many argue the threat of the automatic spending cuts known as the sequester are the only way to force democrats to accept more spending cuts. but their leverage may be limited. >> i think we will have the sequester for a short period of time, probably until the first civilian employee of the government is furloughed, which might take about a week. and then, that pain may be enough to cause the people on ca
was the middle class. president obama underlined that in his state of the union address as did republicans in their response. there is wide-spread agreement america needs to do more to ease the anxieties of middle class families. but as darren gersh reports, solutions that help workers climb into the middle class and stay there are easy to talk about, but hard to implement. >> reporter: it may not solve all the problems, but a rapidly growing economy is a good place to start when it comes to creating middle class jobs. a tight labor market makes it possible for workers to demand raises and better benefits. which is why former obama adviser jared bernstein thinks econic austerity ishe wrong medicine to take right now. >> you have public governments across europe and the united states sort of pulling out their fiscal supports too soon and that's hurting the middle class. >> reporter: of course conservatives consider bloated public spending a burden that threatens long-run economic growth which would hurt the middle class. and that's part of the problem, there are sharp differences over the b
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)